Are we all deficient in Magnesium?

Why We’re All Deficient In Magnesium, The Many Signs & What To Do

Magnesium Deficieny
Magnesium Deficieny
Signs of magnesium deficiency are everywhere in the United States, fi you know what to look for. Unfortunately, the symptoms are so incredibly common that they constantly slip under the radar! Hardly anyone, especially doctors, notice that the ailments we suffer from on a daily basis are actually magnesium deficiency symptoms… and we’re all paying for it.
Just about every single person you come into contact with – especially those with a health problem, but even those with only minor complaints – are suffering in some way from this nationwide deficiency. Including you!

What Exactly Is Magnesium?

Magnesium is life.It is the 4th most abundant mineral in the body, right next to sulfur (which is JUST as important).Along with being a mineral, magnesium is also an electrolyte. “Sports drinks” (aka sugar-filled scams) claim to contain electrolytes such as magnesium, potassium, and sodium because we sweat away these important nutrients during exercise, and their deficiency is what leads to the common problems athletes face, such as muscle cramping! But believe me – electrolytes (especially magnesium) do so much more than treat and prevent muscle cramps.First off, electrolytes are what allow us to be living, electrical beings. They are responsible for all electrical activity (and thus brain conductivity) in the body. Without electrolytes like magnesium, muscles can’t fire, your heart cannot beat, and your brain doesn’t receive any signals. We need magnesium to stay alive, point blank. As soon as we don’t have enough of it, we start to lose the energy and conductivity that keeps us going. Technically, as soon as we become deficient, we slowly begin to die, getting more aches and pains day by day, feeling worse year after year. I can’t stress it enough… signs of magnesium deficiency are everywhere, if you just look.

Magnesium is a cofactor in over three hundred reactions in the body, necessary for transmission of nerve impulses, temperature regulations, detoxification in the liver, and formation of bones and teeth. However, magnesium shows its true power in cardiovascular health. The Weston A. Price foundation writes, “Magnesium alone can fulfill the role of many common cardiac medications: magnesium inhibits blood clots (like aspirin), thins the blood (like Coumadin), blocks calcium uptake (like calcium channel-blocking durgs such as Procardia) and relaxes blood vessels (like ACE inhibitors such as Vasotec) (Pelton, 2001).”

Nearly EVERYONE has signs of magnesium deficiency but we don’t realize it…Symptoms include:

  • Constipation
  • High blood pressure (Hypertension)
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Behavioral disturbances
  • Lethargy
  • Impaired memory/thinking
  • Seizures
  • Fatigue
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Pain
  • Muscle cramps
  • Chronic back pain
  • Headaches
  • Migraines
  • Muscular pain
  • Tendonitis
  • Anger
  • Aggression
  • ADHD
  • Brain fog
  • Tension
  • Anxiety disorders such as OCD

Depression – treat with turmeric!

Turmeric more effective than Prozac at treating depression

by Elizabeth Renter

Turmeric more Effective than Prozac at Treating Depression

Turmeric more Effective than Prozac at Treating Depression

It’s common knowledge in the natural health world that pharmaceuticals often (if not always) do more harm than good. It’s also clear that foods, herbs, and other natural sources can offer similar benefits without those nasty side effects. Once again, our beliefs have been affirmed by science:

A recent study published in Phytotherapy Research says that not only is turmeric effective at treating depression, it may even be more effective than some of the most common anti-depressant drugs currently on the market.

While previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of turmeric (curcumin) in treating serious depression, this study was the first randomized controlled clinical trial of its kind.

Researchers with the Department of Pharmacology of Government Medical College in Bhavnagar, Gujarat, India compared the effects of turmeric and Prozac (fluoxetine), both used together and individually, in 60 patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD).

According to GreenMedInfo.com, the researchers used the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale to measure their results:

“We observed that curcumin was well tolerated by all the patients. The proportion of responders as measured by the HAM-D17 scale was higher in the combination group (77.8%) than in the fluoxetine [Prozac] (64.7%) and the curcumin (62.5%) groups; however, these data were not statistically significant (P = 0.58).

Interestingly, the mean change in HAM-D17 score at the end of six weeks was comparable in all three groups (P = 0.77). This study provides first clinical evidence that curcumin may be used as an effective and safe modality for treatment in patients with MDD without concurrent suicidal ideation or other psychotic disorders.”

While reading the researchers conclusions indicates one treatment (turmeric) is equally effective as Prozac, it doesn’t account for the negative effects of Prozac, which boost turmeric’s value considerably. Prozac is known to cause “suicidal ideation or other psychotic disorders,” frightening side effects that are clearly absent in turmeric use


Read more at http://www.realfarmacy.com/turmeric-more-effective-than-prozac-at-treating-depression/#MJeR2kcttS8qsbrb.99

Beat the blues naturally

 

3 unexpected foods that can help you beat the blues

healthy happy

Turmeric capsules are available from : www.biosil.co.za

 

by Carolanne Wright 

(NaturalNews) Who hasn’t, at one point or another, battled with depression? That unmistakable energy-zapping, soul-crushing and utterly unpleasant state. In these uncertain times of economic failure, joblessness and threats to home and food security, it’s no wonder rates of depression are on the rise. But before relying on risky pharmaceutical antidepressants, consider food-based solutions instead.

Nature’s antidepressants

A nutrient dense diet can go a long way in fending off, if not downright curing, fits of depression. Be that as it may, certain edibles are better at targeting the blues than others. The following three examples have shown exceptional promise in helping to defeat depressive mental states.

1. Fish. A diet low in omega-3 fatty acids has been linked with mood disorders like depression. If you would like to keep a bright outlook, fatty fish such as salmon, trout, sardines and mackerel are excellent choices. Everyday Health notes that “Japanese researchers found that a diet high in fish protects people from depression and suicide, while in Finland a team of researchers surveyed 1,767 residents and concluded that eating fish more than twice a week has a protective effect against suicide and depression.” If you are avoiding fish (or adhere to a vegetarian diet), plant-based sources of omega-3s include sacha inchi, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, flaxseed and chia.

 

Turmeric 90 caps
Turmeric 90 caps

 2.Turmeric

 Good news for all you curry fans out there — it turns out turmeric is superior to Prozac in treating depression. A groundbreaking study in Phytotherapy Research has shown that the bioactive component in turmeric, known as curcumin, “is both safe and effective in treating serious states of depression,” according to GreenMed Info. As an added perk, curcumin actually provides “side-benefits” — protective and healing attributes that go far beyond the management of depression. You can learn more here.

If using turmeric powder to enhance mental function and health, a small pinch of non-irradiated black pepper will improve bioavailability and absorption. Researchers have found that up to 8 grams of turmeric can be consumed per day without adverse effect.

3. Green Tea. Not only is green tea good for keeping the body healthy and fit, but it also encourages positive mental states. The secret lies with L-theanine — a naturally occurring amino acid in green tea that supports clarity while decreasing anxiety and depression. “They say Japanese Buddhist monks could meditate for hours, both alert and relaxed. One reason may have been an amino acid in their green tea called L-theanine,” said Mark Blumenthal, of the American Botanical Council, in the Health article, “19 Natural Remedies for Anxiety.”

One key distinction of the above foods is that they are all anti-inflammatory. Evidently when chronic, low-grade inflammation is present, our risk of depression increases substantially. Ultimately, getting to the root of inflammation is best for naturally eradicating depression. However, until the cause of inflammation is addressed thoroughly, fatty fish, turmeric and green tea can help take the edge off and balance moods.

Sources for this article include:

http://science.naturalnews.com/Curcumin.html

http://www.everydayhealth.com

http://www.greenmedinfo.com

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/200

About the author:
Carolanne believes if we want to see change in the world, we need to be the change. As a nutritionist, natural foods chef and wellness coach, she has encouraged others to embrace a healthy lifestyle of green living for over 13 years. Through her website www.Thrive-Living.net, she looks forward to connecting with other like-minded people who share a similar vision. 

Follow on Facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/Thrive-Living/4995788…

For Pinterest fans: www.pinterest.com/thriveliving/

Find at Google+: www.goo.gl/cEZiyR

and Twitter: www.twitter.com/Thrive_Living 

Read her other articles on Natural News here:

www.naturalnews.com/Author1183.html

The psychiatrist in your gut

Psychobiotics

Psychobiotics: Bacteria For Your Brain?

 

Every functional medicine psychiatrist has case stories of the ‘probiotic cure’ – of a patient with debilitating symptoms, often obsessive compulsive range, whose symptoms remitted completely with dietary change and probiotic supplementation. Is this voodoo or is it based on a growing understanding of the role of the microbiome in mental health and behavior? For two decades now, pioneering researchers have been substantiating inflammatory models of mental illnesses such as depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.  Research has focused on markers that indicate immune distress in an important subset of patients, many of whom are labeled “treatment resistant.” Through this body of literature, we have identified that depression can be induced, in animals and in humans through inflammatory agents, that it is correlated with blood levels of inflammatory markers, in a linear way (more markers = worse depression), and that symptoms can be reversed through pharmaceutical anti-inflammatories.

Inflammatory Models of Mental Illness:

The Role for the Gut

Working with this premise, where is the best place to begin when we consider how to modify inflammatory states in the body, naturally? You guessed it, it’s the gut. Housing >70% of our immune system, the gut is our interface between the outside and inside world, separated by one-cell-thickness. The resident microorganisms, outnumbering by 10:1 by our human body cells, develop an ecosystem through postnatal exposures, in the vaginal canal, through breastfeeding, and the immediate environment.  Disruption to the balance of bacteria through medication exposures, gluten, herbicides, stress, and infection can set the stage for the innate immune system to prepare for attack. Depression, associated with compromised integrity of this intestinal barrier, becomes the swirling storm of inflammation, impairment of cellular machinery (i.e. mitochondria), oxidative stress, and inflammation in a carousel-like forward rotation. Specifically, depression is associated with elevated levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a nutrient-binding, inflammatory toxin produced by bacteria that are intended to remain in the gut.

If depression is a downstream collection of symptoms, and inflammation, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction are driving these symptoms, what is at the source? It appears, from data in animals and humans, that disruption to our gut ecology may be a major player, and the microbiome has stepped to the forefront of cutting-edge psychiatric research.

Enter psychobiotics: “a live organism that, when ingested in adequate amounts, produces a health benefit in patients suffering from psychiatric illness.”

A review by Dinan et al. encompasses the clinical basis for the use of probiotics in mental health with reference to animal studies in which behavioral changes resulted from exposure to bacterial strains such as bifidobacterium and lactobacillus. In placebo-controlled trials in humans, measures of anxiety, chronic fatigue, and depression and anxiety associated with irritable bowel syndrome.

The therapeutic clinical applications of probiotics have been limited to a handful of strains out of the more than 7000 at last count. It appears that colonization is not an expected outcome of probiotic supplementation, and that genomic communication between bacteria and immune receptors may account for anti-inflammatory effects.

Ancient Wisdom

Given how little is known about therapeutic applications of different strains, it may make sense to defer to ancestral practices that confirm the importance of probiotic exposures. In these foods such as lactofermented kimchi, pickles, sauerkraut, and other traditional vegetables, microbes are acting on the food, and the food is then acting on our microbes.

What do bacteria accomplish in the gut? Do they just help with digestion? According to Selhub et al., they:

• Direct protection of the intestinal barrier;

• Influence on local and systemic antioxidant status, reduction in lipid peroxidation;

• Direct, microbial-produced neurochemical production, for example, gammaaminobutyric

acid (GABA);

• Indirect influence on neurotransmitter or neuropeptide production;

• Prevention of stress-induced alterations to overall intestinal microbiota;

• Direct activation of neural pathways between gut and brain;

• Limitation of inflammatory cytokine production;

• Modulation of neurotrophic chemicals, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor;

• Limitation of carbohydrate malabsorption;

• Improvement of nutritional status, for example, omega-3 fatty acids, minerals, dietary

phytochemicals;

• Limitation of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth;

• Reduction of amine or uremic toxin burden;

• Limitation of gastric or intestinal pathogens (for example, Helicobacter pylori);

• Analgesic properties.

Given widespread fermentation practices in traditional cultures, it appears that this dietary wisdom may serve to ameliorate gut-based inflammation and promote optimal nutrient assimilation as described in this review:

Traditional dietary practices have completely divergent effects of blood LPS levels; significant reductions (38%) have been noted after a one-month adherence to a prudent (traditional) diet, while the Western diet provokes LPS elevations .”

In addition to increasing bioavailability and production of minerals, neurochemicals, and fatty acids, fermented foods actually produce methylfolate, an activated form of folate required for methylation: brain chemical synthesis, detox, and gene expression.

Because of the complex coevolution of bacterial strains, cultivated through our food supply, and complementary to our inner microbiomes, we have an opportunity to use therapeutic foods to reeducate an immune system that has been drawn off course. Psychobiotics have the potential to modulate multiple different relevant factors at once:

“This could manifest, behaviorally, via magnified antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, reduction of intestinal permeability and the detrimental effects of LPS, improved glycemic control, positive influence on nutritional status (and therefore neurotransmission and neuropeptide production), direct production of GABA, and other bioactive chemicals, as well as a direct role in gut-to-brain communication via a beneficial shift in the intestinal microbiota itself.”

It is therefore compelling to consider the power of reconnecting to the natural world through our food; communicating through our guts to our brains, that nutrients are plentiful, our bodies are safe, and that our inflammatory systems can be put at ease. It is under these circumstances that the infinite complexity of the endocrine, immune, and gastrointestinal systems can play out, unhindered in support of mental health and wellness.

Source: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/psychobiotics-bacteria-your-brain?page=1

 

How chronic stress rewires your brain and creates mood disorders

How chronic stress rewires your brain and creates mood disorders

by Mike Bundrant

(NaturalNews) The medical is big on theorizing about your chemicals and adding more into the mix. Traditionally trained doctors, however, give little thought into what causes deficiencies in the first place, especially when those causes are psychological.

This is why research into the effects of chronic stress is so important. The effects of psychological stress move beyond the mental, right into your brain chemistry. The following study demonstrates specifically how this happens.

Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley found that those who suffer from chronic stress experience long-term changes in their brain that makes them susceptible to mood disorders and high anxiety.

Associate professor of integrative biology Daniela Kaufer and a team of researchers have studied the hippocampus, which is the area of the brain that governs emotion and memory. They found that chronic stress causes the brain to generate fewer neurons and more myelin-producing cells than normal. This results in more white matter in certain areas of the brain, disrupting the balance and timing of communication within the brain.

The study was published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

Kaufer believes that it may be possible that prolonged stress may develop a stronger connection between the hippocampus and the area of the brain responsible for a person’s fight or flight response, while weakening the hippocampus’ connection with the prefrontal cortex, which moderates those responses.

This would result in quicker fear responses, as well as a reduced ability to shut down those responses. Kaufer is currently involved in a study to test this hypothesis.

Kaufer’s lab also discovered that chronic stress affects the development of stem cells located in the hippocampus. Ordinarily, these cells are believed to only develop into a type of glial cell known as an astrocyte. Under the effects of chronic stress, however, these cells matured into a different type of glial cell called an oligodendrocyte, which produces myelin.

These cells also help form synapses. Kaufer believes that because fewer neurons are formed under chronic stress, this could explain why it has such an effect on memory and learning. She is now conducting experiments to see if early-life stress reduces a person’s resilience later in their life.

Five ways we heap stress upon ourselves

Chronic, negative stress can be eliminated, however, we tend to cling to it in various ways. Here are five of them.

fitness has a long-term effect on a wide range of cognitive abilities like reasoning, remembering, understanding and problem solving

1. Refusing to exercise

Physical exercise is among the most effective ways to reduce stress. And it may be essential. You’d be hard-pressed to find any health authority, conventional or alternative, who doesn’t promote regular exercise to reduce stress and balance the mind and body.

Yet, we are a nation of couch potatoes. The Center for Disease Control estimates that 80% of Americans do not get the recommended amount of physical exercise.

2. Neglecting to treat PTSD

Chronic stress that comes from unresolved physical, sexual and emotional trauma can be devastating. Fortunately, it is one of the most treatable mental health issues. Therapeutic use of modalities such as Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Neurolinguistic Programming(NLP) and cognitive behavioral approaches have a very high success rate in eliminating the flashbacks, anxiety, nightmares and chronic restimulation of past trauma.

It’s understandable that some people fear the treatment, but also very unfortunate that more people don’t take advantage of these options. If you have emotional trauma in your past, isn’t it time to deal with it and let go? You absolutely can, with help.

3. Catastrophic over-commitment to busy-ness

To say that people keep themselves busy these days is an understatement. In fact, being busier than you can handle is almost a status symbol. If you can say, “Oh I am so busy that I can barely think straight” it must mean that you are not a loser.

When you can’t say no to work, family and community opportunities, you tend to over do it and live with more on your plate that you can possibly accomplish. This adds up to stress.

4. Horrific nutrition

The standard Western diet is full of sugar, artificial chemicals, caffeine, gluten, candida-promoting foods, alcohol, bad fats and empty calories that make it impossible for your body to balance itself. When your standard fare is junk, you will end up mentally and emotionally depleted and more stressed than you would be otherwise.

Water is an essential part of nutrition as well. And most people don’t get enough. The Panhandle Health District suggests that 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated and that lack of water is the #1 trigger of daytime fatigue.

5. Psychological attachments and self-sabotage

This is the granddaddy of them all, in my opinion. Self-sabotage will compel you to say yes when you mean no, eat and drink junk that makes you feel bad, stay up late when you need to get up early, waste time, work too much and hang around people who tend to control, reject or deprive you.

Self-sabotage draws you toward the negativity in life as if you belonged there. Amazingly, self-sabotage usually feels passive. In other words, it happens on autopilot, as if it were happening to you and not a product of your own decisions (until you understand how it works).
Chronic stress is the inevitable result.

It’s possible to live a simple, calm life that is relatively free of chronic, negative stress. Lack of exercise, PTSD, over-committing, bad nutrition and self-sabotage will prevent this from happening. From the results of the above study, it is apparently causing brain damage.

To learn how self-sabotage works and how to stop it, watch this free video.

If you like this article, then like my Facebook Page to keep up with all my writing.

About the author:
Watch the free video The AHA! Process: An End to Self-Sabotage and discover the lost keys to personal transformation and emotional well-being that have been suppressed by mainstream mental health for decades.

The information in this video has been called the missing link in mental health and personal development. In a world full of shallow, quick-fix techniques, second rate psychology and pharmaceutical takeovers, real solutions have become nearly impossible to find. Click here to watch the presentation that will turn your world upside down.

Source: http://www.naturalnews.com/z044095_chronic_stress_neurology_self-sabotage.html

Mike Bundrant is co-founder of the iNLP Center and host of Mental Health Exposed, a Natural News Radio program.

Follow Mike on Facebook for daily personal development tips.

Drink coffee …… and smile!

BIO-SIL note – we recommend using only pure coffee beans for your tipple!

How drinking coffee can give you a long, happy life

by Sarka-Jonae Miller

(NaturalNews) People joke about how drinking coffee has created a culture of caffeine junkies, people who are basically zombies without their cups of Joe. But the reality is that while some people will take anything to excess, moderate coffee consumption may actually be good for you. Very good. Research links drinking coffee to lowered risk of serious health condition, to longevity, and to better moods.

Coffee fights diseases

Studies indicate that drinking coffee correlates with lower risks of diabetes and heart diseases, two major contributors to premature death. It could also have a protective effect against Alzheimer’s disease or delay the onset. These benefits only seem to come from consuming coffee with caffeine though; decaf doesn’t do the trick.

Researchers from two universities in the United States discovered a link between greater levels of caffeine in the blood of people aged 65 and older with later appearances of Alzheimer’s. According to the people from the Universities of South Florida and Miami, higher levels of caffeine appeared to correlate to a delay of two to four years of the disease when compared to people who had lower blood caffeine levels.

Dr. Chuanhai Cao of the University of San Francisco said that drinking caffeinated coffee in moderation won’t necessarily prevent Alzheimer’s, but the researchers think that it could significantly decrease Alzheimer’s risk or at least delay the development.

Coffee is also a rich source of antioxidants that protect people from a variety of diseases. A 2005 study found that nothing else gives people nearly as many as antioxidants as coffee provides. For Americans, it is the number one source of antioxidants. Although there are other sources of antioxidants, such as fresh fruits and veggies, the human body is able to absorb more of these beneficial substances from coffee.

Coffee makes you happy

There is plenty of anecdotal evidence that coffee boosts the mood. Just hang out in Starbucks and watch the faces of the people who come in and then see their faces change after they have their drinks. But a National Institutes of Health discovered that at least four cups of Joe per day correlates to a 10 percent lower risk of depression. The author of the study, Honglei Chen, MD, PhD, hypothesized that antioxidants are responsible.

Another study found a link between coffee and suicide risk. The Harvard School of Public Health study showed that people who consumed around two to four cups of java had only about half the risk of suicide. The suspected reason is that coffee assists the body to make neurotransmitters including dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin. These chemicals help to fight depression.

Coffee may extend life

Most people aspire to live long happy lives, and coffee can assist with that not only by elevating the mood and staving off diseases, but it also may simply help you live longer. A 2012 study found that people who drank at least three cups daily had a lower risk of death. Both regular and decaf seemed to have a positive effect. A study from 2008 published in the Annals of Internal Medicine had similar findings.

So, if you feel guilty about how much coffee you drink, don’t. Of course, these studies were all done with coffee, not expensive, high-calorie, extra sweet coffee-flavored beverages. There are no studies to support that habit.

Sources for this article include:

http://phys.org/news6067.html

http://www.cbsnews.com

http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=668690

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1112010

http://news.harvard.edu

http://miami.cbslocal.com

About the author:
Sarka-Jonae Miller is a personal trainer, massage therapist, novelist, and blogger. Get more health and wellness tips on Sarka’s Natural Healing Tips blog,
Facebook page, or Twitter.