Wood-scuffings restored easy peasy

Restore your scuffed wood naturally

 

I have been asked to repost this again. Please, be sure to SHARE in order to SAVE to your timeline so you can return to it, when needed! </p><p>Naturally Repair Wood With Vinegar and Canola Oil. So, for a super cheap, use 3/4 cup of oil, add 1/4 cup vinegar. white or apple cider vinegar, mix it in a jar, then rub it into the wood. You don’t need to wipe it off; the wood just soaks it in.<br />~~~~~~~~~~~~~~...<br />To ~SAVE~ this, be sure to ~SHARE~ so it will be stored on your personal Timeline!For more great tips, recipes, DIY ideas, motivation and inspiration, CLICK and JOIN US HERE www.facebook.com/groups/GettingHealthyWithGail
 I have been asked to repost this again. Please, be sure to SHARE in order to SAVE to your timeline so you can return to it, when needed! Naturally Repair Wood With Vinegar and Canola Oil. So, for a super cheap, use 3/4 cup of oil, add 1/4 cup vinegar. white or apple cider vinegar, mix it in a jar, then rub it into the wood. You don’t need to wipe it off; the wood just soaks it in.
For more great tips, recipes, DIY ideas, motivation and inspiration, CLICK and JOIN US HERE www.facebook.com/groups/GettingHealthyWithGail

Cayenne Pepper – most powerful herb!

Wopw – I had no idea!

Please see hereunder some comments on this posting for yet further valuable information:

  • Nathan Raaths I did not know that , we use a mixture of dandelion root , lemon juice and cayenne pepper daily when we are cutting fat to reach our fight weights but I had no idea our versatile it was !
  • Colleen Thompson Fantastic stuff… really DOES reverse heart attacks immediately!!! Have witnessed it… 1 tsp in glass of water!
  • Marmie Davies Yes I can vouch for that Thank you

  • Kathy Carter I agree, they need to put a few hints and tips on how to use it. Otherwise most people will blow it off because of lack of time and etc. BUT !! It’s wonderful for sore thoats !! Where Chloroceptic,Halls and etc, just numb it for a few minutes (if that) Cayenne actually heals it !! And it doesn’t take but a few times using it. I put it in boiling water & let it steep til cooled down to drinking temp., put some sugar or honey to sweeten, and sip, sip, sip. Use as much Cayenne as you can stand. It will burn a little, but that’s what you want. When it burns, it draws excess blood to that area and makes it heal !! I’ve used it for years, used it for my kids, made it for friends. It works !!
  • Andy Sweeney I add it to tomato dishes, beans, rice, in sauces, as Sri racha, add to ketchup, soups, any savory dish, zing zap germs be gone!
  • Jane Dieffenbacher Saved Tommy Dieffebacher from 6 heart attacks ( James dad)
  • Jane Dieffenbacher I heaping tablespoon dry powder and down it with water while they are passed out . 5 seconds they are up asking me what happened .
    • Larry Harvey I met a long lost cousin at a reunion years ago and he saw me limping. He said crush it into a poultice and wrap my knee up with it every day for a week and is never have any more pain. I didn’t try it but he said he did and it worked.
      • Sara Nicole It’s great for speeding up metabolism too! I add it to my morning elixir
      • Dalbert Butcher Never, ever use this while drinking alcohol.
      • Karyn Kidd I eat capsicum (the non hot type) daily in salads, good stuff. Its great for your stomach.
      • Kristina Stuteville Cayenne, is an accelerator for any herbal supplement! It is wonderful!!!
      • Connie Conway Leslie I use it in the evening; heat 3/4 cup of water with 2 tablespoon lemon juice until it is hot but drinkable. Then add in 3 shakes of cayenne, and a little sugar to taste. I drink it before bed, it helps me lose excess water retention…
        • Kania Setiyawan Wow, did you know that Indonesian people can’t live without it? We eat it for breakfast, lunch, dinner… every day!
        • Jennifer Didier I put this on everything!
        • Anne Reid My husband has been taking cayenne capsules for many years for his sore knees ( hockey injuries). No more sore knees for him.

20 Uses for Leftover Fruit and Veg Peels

Twenty Uses for Leftover Fruit and Vegetable Peels

By Treehugger

Don’t throw your kitchen scraps away, put them to work. The outer skins of fruit and vegetables are filled with flavor and vitamins, and most often have enough matter left in them for another go-round.

Some people are peelers, some people aren’t. Some people swear by the nutrients and fiber found in produce skins, others shy away from the taste or texture, or prefer removing the outer layer to reduce pesticide load. Regardless of your peeling preferences, citrus rinds, potato and other root/tuber peels, scooped-out avocados, and even cheese rinds all have more than one life.

Aim to use organic produce in these applications, and make sure to scrub well. And if you don’t have time or need for them at the moment, most of them can be frozen for future use.

HOME

1. Clean Greasy Messes

Before bringing out the big (toxic) cleaning gunsin the kitchen, try lemon. Sprinkle affected area with salt or baking soda (to act as an abrasive) and then rub with juiced lemon halves. (Be careful using lemon on sensitive surfaces such as marble.)

2. Shine Your Coffee Pot

For the old diner trick to make glass coffee pots sparkle: Add ice, salt and lemon rinds to an empty coffee pot; swirl around for a minute or two, dump, and rinse well.

3. Clean Your Tea Kettle

For mineral deposit build up in tea kettles, fill the vessel with water and a handful of lemon peels and bring to a boil. Turn off heat and let sit for an hour, drain, and rinse well.

4. Dye Fabric

Pomegranate peels make for great coloring material. Use a stainless steel pot large enough to cover the fabric, fill with hot water and add peels, let it sit overnight. Simmer the water and peels the next day and then remove peels and add wet fabric. Simmer gently for one hour and allow to cool overnight. Remove the next day, rinse in cool water–from thereon, wash with similar colors.

FOOD

5. Make Zest

If you’ve juiced lemons, limes, oranges, or grapefruit but don’t have an immediate need for zest, you can make it anyway and dry or freeze it for future use—zest is a versatile item to have on hand for a bright boost in any number of dishes. If you don’t have a microplane or zester, you can also use the small side of a box grater. Try to scrape just the outer layer, the white layer of pith is bitter. Freeze in an airtight container. To dry, spread the zest on a towel and leave until dried, then store in a clean jar.

6. Make Citrus Extract Powder

Make zest or twists (lemons, limes, oranges, or grapefruit) being sure to remove the pith–and allow to dry, about 3 or 4 days for twists, less for zest. Put in a blender (or spice grinder) and pulverize into a powder. Store in a clean jar.

7. Make Citrus Sugar

Make citrus extract powder and add it to sugar, or you can use fresh twists, put them in a jar with sugar, let the peel’s oil infuse the sugar and remove.

8. Make Lemon Pepper

Mix lemon extract powder with freshly cracked pepper.

9. Make Citrus Olive Oil

Pound citrus peel (pith removed) in a mortar and pestle with some oil added. Place in a jar with more oil and let rest for six hours. Strain into a clean jar.

10. Make Infusions

Infuse honey or vinegar with citrus peels by placing twists and letting the flavors seep. Strain the liquid and store in a clean jar.

11. Make Potato Crisps

Mix potato peels with enough lemon juice and olive oil to evenly coat. Spread the potato peels in a layer on a baking sheet and cook at 400 degrees, stirring once, until golden brown (about 10 minutes). Season to taste.

12. Make Stock
Boil potato peels, onion skins, carrot peels, leek ends, etc for vegetable stock. (Also save fresh herb stems for this!)

13. Boost Soup and Stock

Cheese rinds (sans wax) can be placed in soup stocks for an awesome secret boost of flavor and texture.

14. Add “Meat” to Greens

Cheese rinds can also be added to braised greens for added flavor depth.

15. Keep Brown Sugar Soft

If you regularly fall victim to the brick in the pantry known as hardened brown sugar, try adding some lemon peel (with traces of pulp and pith removed) to keep it moist and pliable.

16. Make Vanilla Sugar

If you use fresh vanilla, after scraping the bean, add the pod to sugar to make vanilla-infused sugar.

BEAUTY

17. Make a Banana Sugar Scrub

Sprinkle sugar on the flesh side of banana peels and use as a soft, exfoliating loofa. Rub gently all over your body and then rinse in the shower.

18. Refresh Your Face

For a skin tonic, rub orange or grapefruit peels on your face (avoiding your eyes) and then gently rinse with warm water.

19. Moisturize

Rub the fleshy part of an avocado peel on your face for a rich moisturizer.

20. Relieve Your Peepers

Potato peels can reduce puffiness around eyes; press the moist side of the fresh peels to the skin for 15 minutes.

Grow a barrel of potatoes

4 Simple Steps to Grow a Hundred 

Pounds of Potatoes in a Barrel 


Container gardening isn’t only for savvy urban gardeners and folks with limited space to grow, it can also be for folks who want to maximize their yields in a controlled environment. Not only does growing potatoes in a barrel reduce the amount of weeding and exposure to pests and fungi, you don’t even have to risk shovel-damage to the tender potatoes by digging them out of the ground when they’re done, just tip the container over!

After extensive research to plan my own potatoes-in-a-barrel, I’ve boiled all of the recommendations down to 4 simple steps to a winning potato harvest.

1. Select and prepare a container

You’ll need to pick out a container such as a 50-gallon trash barrel or one of those half whiskey barrel planters. Alternatively, you can buy used food-grade barrels or commercially-available potato planters. Just about any 2 to 3-foot tall container will work, but be sure to select a container that either already has holes in it, or is okay to cut holes in. Next you’ll want to clean your container with a mild bleach solution to get out any of the nasties that have been lingering in there. If you don’t want to use bleach, you can make a bleach alternative to use instead.

Good drainage is critical for the cultivation of healthy potatoes so you’ll want to cut or drill a series of large drainage holes in the bottom and bottom sides of your container. Alternatively, you can cut out the bottom altogether and place it on a well-drained surface like your garden bed.

seed-potatoes

2. Choose a variety and plant potatoes

Seed potatoes can usually be found at nurseries early in the growing season, but you should only have to buy them once. If you can, “chit” or sprout your potatoes before planting them by setting them out in an egg carton, the side with the most buds facing up, and putting them in a cool light room out of direct sunlight to sprout. Putting the tubers in an open paper bag can have this same effect.

Fill in the bottom of your container with about 6 inches of loose planting mix and compost. You’ll want to use a planting mix with a peat moss-like soil amendment like this product made from repurposed coconut husks, doing so will keep the soil from becoming too compacted and help it to store moisture for the roots. Next, add some seed potatoes on the layer of soil, making certain to leave plenty of space between each cube. You can use the whole potato but I like to cut the potatoes into 1 to 2-inch cubes for planting. Loosely backfill the potatoes with another 6 inches of your soil and compost mix and water to dampen soil. Keep the soil damp at all times but be careful not to overwater.

3. Add more soil

When they have about 6 to 8 inches of foliage, add another layer of your soil-compost mix covering about one-half to three-quarters of the visible stems and foliage. Repeat this process of allowing the sprouts to grow and then covering the sprouts and moistening the soil as the plants grow up toward the top of the barrel.

Barrel potatoes

4. Harvest the potatoes

After about 10 weeks or until the plants flower and start to yellow, the potatoes should be ready to harvest. Carefully dig down with your hands to inspect the top-most layer. After you’ve confirmed your suspicions, dump the barrel out on a tarp and inspect your bounty.

Other tips to grow bushels of barrel potatoes

  • After the first harvest, keep a few potatoes to use as seed potatoes next year.
  • Bush beans are a great companion plant for potatoes.
  • Instead of using soil, try growing potatoes in sawdust.
  • Experiment with different containers, seed potatoes and watering regimes.
  • If the above steps aren’t sufficient, do some more research. Try here.

Have any photos or useful tips for growing potatoes in a barrel? Please share!

More gardening tips

Photos: CC licensed via flickr users: Forestry ImagesCrinklecrackle.com;GraibeardDaves CupboardSunfellEnjoyGardeningvyuseem

Gardening makes you happier and smarter!

Science Shows Gardening Makes You Happier and Smarter

Science-shows-gardening-mak

The glory of gardening: hands in the dirt, head in the sun, heart with nature. To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul.” – Alfred Austin

Gardeners have been knowing for centuries that their pastime gives them joy and peace. Many people will say that gardening is stress therapy. There is even a group called the American Horticultural Therapy Association “committed to promoting and developing the practice of horticultural therapy as a unique and dynamic human service modality.”

As with so many things, science introduces us to the physical wonders behind what we already know on a subliminal level. There are two interesting pieces of research that give credence to the feeling that our bodies and souls are better off from gardening.

Researchers reported in the journal Neuroscience that contact with a soil bacteria called Mycobacterium vaccae triggers the release of serotonin in the brain. This type of serotonin acts on several different pathways including mood and learning. Lack of serotonin in the brains is related to depression.

So basically, the things we do as gardeners—working the soil, planting, mulching, and so forth—can really contribute to happiness. We ingest the bacteria by breathing or through broken skin. The simple act of children playing outside in the grass and dirt can be a natural way for them to reduce anxiety.
Read more at

http://www.realfarmacy.com/science-shows-gardening-makes-you-happier-and-smarter/#a42EDJYca3tKQjUV.99

DIY Coconut Milk

Coconut Milk Recipe

Coconut Milk Recipe

It’s really quite easy to make your own coconut milk. In fact, if you’re looking for a dairy alternative, you can make nut milk, rice milk or any other type of milk in just a matter of minutes once your nuts or seeds are soaked over night and rinsed thoroughly.

 Why You May Choose to Opt Out of Dairy Milk

 1. Pasteurized dairy can contain toxins. Pasteurized, factory farmed dairy milk may contain blood, pus, feces, antibiotics, pesticides and growth hormones that impeded the human bodies ability to heal, and remain balanced.

 2. Is indigestible for many people after the age of three. Rennin and lactase are needed to break down the casein and lactose present in milk. Once a child stops breastfeeding, at roughly the age of three years old, their body can stop producing these enzymes necessary to digest milk, which is the reason why children and adults can find milk hard to process.

 3. Precipitates the formation of mucus which the body attempts to detoxify. The presence of dairy in the body (including cheese, yogurt and ice cream) creates mucosal detoxification in the form of runny noses, coughing up phlegm, the common cold, asthma, sinusitis and bronchitis. This is why many parents of children with asthma or who experience numerous colds are now choosing to stop giving their children pasteurized milk.

If you think that it’s time to start making your own dairy-alternative milk, I suggest a nut milk or a coconut milk!

 Coconut milk is known for many benefits, including:

  •  Helping to maintain blood sugar
  • Keeping skin and blood vessels elastic and flexible
  • Building strong bones
  • Preventing anemia
  • Relaxing muscles and nerves
  • Controlling your weight
  • Decreasing joint inflammation
  • Promoting a healthy immune system

As with anything, I try to make as much as I can fresh. I make my own coconut milk, as well as other nut milks, though it of course it helps that I live and travel in the tropics, where coconuts are fresh and abundant.

All you need to make your own fresh coconut milk is:

  •  2 Young Thai Coconuts – this is important. You will want to make sure you select the right coconuts. The younger coconuts have soft flesh on the inside. In the older ones, the flesh has hardened considerably.
  • A dash of sea salt
  • A dash of sweetener – such as honey.
  • A blender
  • Nut milk bag – or you can use cheesecloth or nylon is an alternative.

Here are the steps:

1. First, break open your coconuts. I recommend using a heavy cleaver to do so.

 2. Second, pour the liquid into the blender – make sure that you have strained out any pieces of coconut shell or husk that may be in the liquid.

 3. Scoop out the flesh with a spoon and add it to the blender.

 4. Blend on high for a minute and then strain the mixture through a nut milk bag or cheese cloth. You can save the ‘pulp’ for a future recipe!

 5. Return to the blender and add a dash of sea salt and about 1 tsp. of sweetener like honey, dates or maple syrup – this will help preserve the milk.

 6. Blend again for 10 seconds, then transfer your milk to a jar or container and store in the fridge!

 Easy, right?!

This batch of coconut milk will last about 4 or 5 days, although I find myself making it fresh every other day. I use it in my tea, my smoothies, my soups … In everything!

Avo pips? Great benefits?!

13 Great Benefits of Eating Avocado Seeds

October 24, 2012
avocado-seed

 

By Dr Paul HaiderHealth-benefits-of-avocado-seeds

Everyone knows about Avocados… but did you know that Avocado Seeds are full of great health benefits?

Avocado Seeds have more antioxidants than most fruits and veggies on the market and polyphenols like green tea, plus they are full of more soluble fiber than just about any other food. — Wow! 

In fact Avocado Seed has 70% of the antioxidants found in the whole Avocado, and Avocado Seed Oil is also full of antioxidants, lowers cholesterol, and helps fight off disease. And studies show that Avocado Seed has more soluble fiber than oatmeal and just about any other food. Avocado Seed helps to prevent cardiovascular disease, lower cholesterol, and prevent strokes.

Avocado Seed are great for inflammation of the GI tract and diarrhea too! In fact in South America Avocado Seeds are used for dysentery and other GI tract problems. Avocado Seeds has lots of phenolic compounds that help to prevent gastric ulcers, and prevent bacterial and viral diseases.

Avocado Seed contains a flavonol that prevents tumor growth… in fact studies with rats with cancer given Avocado Seed powder looks promising.

Avocado Seeds boost your immune system and keep you from coming down with debilitating diseases. Keeping your immune system high, because antioxidants keep free radicals at bay… and slows the aging process. Avocado Seeds seems to have a good anti-inflammatory ability and thus helps with arthritis and other joint diseases.

Avocado Seed Oil has been shown in studies to increase collagen in your skin thus helping to keep your skin looking young and wrinkle free. Avocado Seed Oil will make your hair shinny and help get rid of dry dead skin.

Avocado Seed Extract studies show that it lowers blood glucose and helps you lose weight… and Avocado Seeds grated, roast, and made into a tea is really great for asthma. And in QiGong Medicine… Avocado Seed is very high in Qi energy… powerful stuff!

Avocado Seeds can be dried, then crushed in a plastic bag with a hammer, then ground in a heavy duty blender (use only 1/2 the seed… and remember they are too hard for most blenders) and grind it up into a powder. And Avocado Seed can be sliced and roast in the oven too! Remember Avocado Seed is slightly bitter so make sure to add it to smoothies and sauces that cover up the bitterness.

Save that Avocado Seed… it’s good for your health!

Dr. Paul Haider is an internationally renowned author and speaker in the field of self-development. He’s the author of many books, having created many audio programs and videos, and has appeared on radio shows and television. His books “Relax into Success” and “21 Ways to Live a Stress Free Life in Only 21 Days” have sold countless copies.

To learn more about Dr Paul Haider, visit www.paulhaider.com

 

 

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Flowers and plants to attract bees

Top 30 Flowers For Bees

ahoney_bee_bta_092708_074
HA= Hardy annual
HHA =Half hardy annual
P = Perennial
HB= Hardy biennial
HS= Hardy shrub
  • 1
    Cosmos (HHA) is an annual flower easily raised from seed. It’s also one of the very best for the bee. Grow it in groups, making the collection of pollen easier for the bees, who won’t have to fly as far to find their food. Cosmos grows 2-5ft tall, the majority reaching about 2ft. It’s from Mexico, so a half hardy annual. Plant out after all danger of frost has passed, and deadhead to keep them flowering continuously through the summer. These open, flat flowers will delight you as well as giving the bees a feast.
  • 2
    Aster (HHA) ‘Compostion’ or Michaelmass Daisies. Many modern hybrids have little or no pollen. easy to grow, colorful and late summer to autumn flowering, they provide food late in the season. Important if honeybees are to be well fed to get through the winter months.
  • 3
    Sunflowers (HA) are a great choice, available in many heights and colours to suit your garden space. Choose yellow or orange over red, which bees don’t like. Varieties exist now for the allergic gardener, containing no pollen. Obviously avoid these when wishing to attract bees.
  • 4
    Calendulas or marigolds (HA) are great for bees, especially the original single flowered pot marigold. Dead head regularly for a longer flowering period.
  • 5
    Primulas. (HP) The native primrose, (primula vulgaris), primulas of all kinds, even the drumstick ones are great early food for bees. Cowslips (primula veris) are also good members of this extensive family of perennial plants.
  • 6
    Rudbekia (HHA) are an extensive group of cone flowers from the aster family. A wide variety of heights, mostly available in yellows and oranges, sure to brighten your border and feed bees. There are also a few hardy perennial ones, of which ‘Goldsturn’ is my personal favourite. All are easy to grow from seed.
  • 7
    Scabious or cornflowers (HA), another aster family member, are mostly blue flowered and bees adore them. Dead-headed regularly, they’ll flower all summer long.
  • 8
    Lavender (HHS) There are plenty of lavenders to choose from, all needing plenty of sun and well drained soil, but they’ll reward you with plenty of fragrant flowers for cutting and drying. Just watch them get smothered in bees when they come into flower.
  • 9
    Bluebells (bulb) Another early food supply. Just a note of caution for UK growers. The native English bluebell in now under threat from the Spanish bluebell, which outcompetes and crosses with it. So please ensure you are planting the native bluebell to ensure you don’t endanger a bluebell woodland near you.
  • 10
    Hellebores (HP) The Christmas rose! A lovely flower to have in your garden from late winter to early spring, this plant will tolerate some shade and moist conditions, though not wet. When bees emerge from hibernation they need food fast. This one gives them a snack when there’s little else around.
  • 11
    Clematis (Perennial climber) The majority of clematis will provide pollen, and I’ve watched bees happily moving from flower to flower gathering their crop. Always plant clematis deeper than they were in the container, as this gives more protection against cleamits wilt. These plants are hungry and thirsty, so add good compost to the planting hole. They also like their roots in the cool and heads in the sun, so once planted I place either a thick mulch or a pile of stones or gravel around their roots, keeping them cool and conserving moisture.
  • 12
    Crocus (bulb) Early flowering, plenty to choose from, and planted in the autumn to flower year after year. These are great value and cheer me up as well as the bees!
  • 13
    Mint (HP), especially water mint, is loved by bees. It’s great in your cooking, too. Easy to grow, it can be a bit of a thug, so either grow it in a container or prevent its escape around the garden by burying a bucket (with holes in the bottom for drainage) and plant your mint into that.
  • 14
    Rosemary (HHS) A mediterranean herb, rosemary likes well drained soild and full sun. It flowers around April/May. A great culinary herb, bees will take advantage of the pollen as long as you prune it correctly. This is best done straight after flowering, as most of the flowers will appear on new wood. Don’t prune rosemary back to old, bare wood as these are not likely to regrow. Depending on where you live and soil conditions, rosemary can be short lived, so take some cuttings each year so you can replace the old plant should it dsie or become too leggy.

    English: Honey Bee on Sedum Up until around a ...
    English: Honey Bee on Sedum Up until around a year ago the blooms of these flowers would be covered in honey bees. This year just one solitary bee is making its way round all the flower heads. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
  • 15
    Thyme (H to HHS)) There are now quite a few varieties available, tasting slightly different to each other eg lemon thyme. However, I’ve noticed that the wild thyme (thymus serpyllum) attracts a lot of bee visitors and tends to flower more profusely. But they are all worth growing. Give them the same growing conditions as rosemary and lavender.
  • 16
    Hebe (HH-HS) This extensive group of shrubs have wonderful flowers for bees. Plenty of pollen, all on one flower and plenty of flowers on one shrub. They vary in height, are mosly blue or pink and tolerate most soils. They dislike too much wet, so a well drained soil is best. Water well, though, until established.
  • 17
    Borage, the bee herb. (HA) Borage is blue flowered, simple to grow and in fact one type grows wild in the UK, though originally from Syria. Easy, prolific and the bees love it.
  • 18
    Echinacea, the cone flower. (HP) Now available in a variety of colours, all of which will attract bees. Echinacea Tennesseensis will attract birds, bees and butterflies.
  • 19
    Mignotette. There are HA, HHA and Perennial members of this family. They are sweetly scented and will attract and feed your bees, especially Reseda lutea.
  • 20
    Thrift, or Sea Pink (HP) is a great plant for a rock garden, trough or wall. Holding its bright pink flowers well above the grass-like foliage, it will cheer your garden and make the bees come back for more! Give it well drained condiitons and lots of sun.
  • 21
    Sedums are also excellent plants for rock gardens and walls. There are many to choose from, but avoid Sedum Spectabilis Autumn Joy if you’re planting for bees. Biting stonecrop and English stonecrop (sedums acre and anglicum). are natives, and great for bees.
  • 22

    Sweet Williams (Dianthus barbatus) (HB) are fantastic flowers for bees. An old cottage garden favourite, bees are attracted to the pink or white flowers and we love the perfume! They are members of the dianthus family, as are Pinks and Carna

    This image was selected as a picture of the we...
    This image was selected as a picture of the week on the Malay Wikipedia for the 46th week, 2009. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Burns – Act fast and use egg whites

If we had only known..!<br />A young man sprinkling his lawn and bushes with pesticides wanted to check the contents of the barrel to see how much pesticide remained in it. He raised the cover and lit his lighter; the vapors ignited and engulfed him He jumped from his truck, screaming.</p><p>His neighbor came out of her house with a dozen eggs and a bowl yelling: "bring me some more eggs!"</p><p>She broke them, separating the whites from the yolks.<br />The neighbor woman helped her to apply the whites onto the young man's face.</p><p>When the ambulance arrived and the EMTs saw the young man, they asked who had done this. Everyone pointed to the lady in charge.</p><p>They congratulated her and said: "You have saved his face."</p><p>By the end of the summer, the young man brought the lady a bouquet of roses to thank her. His face was like a baby's skin.<br />A Healing Miracle for Burns:</p><p>Keep in mind this treatment of burns is being included in teaching beginner fireman. First Aid consists of first spraying cold water on the affected area until the heat is reduced which stops the continued burning of all layers of the skin. Then, spread the egg whites onto the affected area.</p><p>One woman burned a large part of her hand with boiling water. In spite of the pain, she ran cold faucet water on her hand, separated 2 egg whites from the yolks, beat them slightly and dipped her hand in the solution. The whites then dried and formed a protective layer.</p><p>She later learned that the egg white is a natural collagen and continued during at least one hour to apply layer upon layer of beaten egg white. By afternoon she no longer felt any pain and the next day there was hardly a trace of the burn. 10 days later, no trace was left at all and her skin had regained its normal color. The burned area was totally regenerated thanks to the collagen in the egg whites, a placenta full of vitamins.Since this information could be helpful to everyone: Please pass it on?<br />From Rick Loebach's
If we had only known..!
A young man sprinkling his lawn and bushes with pesticides wanted to check the contents of the barrel to see how much pesticide remained in it. He raised the cover and lit his lighter; the vapors ignited and engulfed him He jumped from his truck, screaming.His neighbor came out of her house with a dozen eggs and a bowl yelling: “bring me some more eggs!”She broke them, separating the whites from the yolks.
The neighbor woman helped her to apply the whites onto the young man’s face.

When the ambulance arrived and the EMTs saw the young man, they asked who had done this. Everyone pointed to the lady in charge.

They congratulated her and said: “You have saved his face.”

By the end of the summer, the young man brought the lady a bouquet of roses to thank her. His face was like a baby’s skin.
A Healing Miracle for Burns:

Keep in mind this treatment of burns is being included in teaching beginner fireman. First Aid consists of first spraying cold water on the affected area until the heat is reduced which stops the continued burning of all layers of the skin. Then, spread the egg whites onto the affected area.

One woman burned a large part of her hand with boiling water. In spite of the pain, she ran cold faucet water on her hand, separated 2 egg whites from the yolks, beat them slightly and dipped her hand in the solution. The whites then dried and formed a protective layer.

She later learned that the egg white is a natural collagen and continued during at least one hour to apply layer upon layer of beaten egg white. By afternoon she no longer felt any pain and the next day there was hardly a trace of the burn. 10 days later, no trace was left at all and her skin had regained its normal color. The burned area was totally regenerated thanks to the collagen in the egg whites, a placenta full of vitamins.

Since this information could be helpful to everyone: Please pass it on?
From Rick Loebach’s

Butter is Best

This was just another blindside for the us folks – truth out better –  later than never!

 

At last, the truth:

Butter is GOOD for you –

and margarine is chemical gunk

  • We have been conned into believing margarine was better for us than butter
  • The scientific evidence is totally at odds with decades of official advice
  • The profit-grabbing manufacturers have never been prepared to admit

By JOANNA BLYTHMAN

PUBLISHED: 00:52 GMT, 7 February 2013 | UPDATED: 07:49 GMT, 7 February 2013

Like my grandmother before me, I have never had a tub of margarine in the house. Perhaps thanks to her, my gut instinct has always told me that butter is better for you.

Not only does butter taste incomparably better, it’s a natural product that human beings have been eating and cooking with for centuries without ­damaging their health.

Why swap it for margarine, a highly synthetic and unpleasant-tasting concoction laced with additives and cheap, low-grade oils refined on an industrial scale?

The truth: Evidence shows butter is better for you than margarine despite decades of advice to the contrary
The truth: Evidence shows butter is better for you than margarine despite decades of advice to the contrary

Especially, if I tell you that without colourings margarine isn’t yellow at all, but actually an appetite-crushing shade of sludgy grey.

If my preference for butter began with instinct, in the past few years it’s been supported by a growing body of scientific research that not only indicates that there is absolutely no reason to stop eating ­butter, but also leads to one inescapable conclusion: that decades of government health advice, particularly in regard to heart disease, cholesterol levels and the consumption of fats and oils, have been plain wrong.

It’s so wrong, in fact, that I believe the health establishment now owes us an apology.

We have been conned into believing that margarine was better for us than butter. The nation’s morning toast has been ruined for decades by kind-hearted women thinking they were doing the best for their ­husbands and children by switching from butter to marge.

Confronted with such a bleak, butter-free future, there will be many who will have wondered whether life was even worth living.

That is why the latest news from scientists working in the U.S. will have been greeted with loud cheers at breakfast tables all over Britain — and, at mine, by a vehement ‘I told you so!’

For, having reanalysed a study originally carried out in the late Sixties and early Seventies, the scientists have confirmed what many of us have believed to be the truth for years.

Margarine isn’t better for you than butter. In fact, margarine is ­actually more damaging to your health than butter.

The scientific evidence is compelling and totally at odds with decades of official advice that we should all be cutting down on our consumption of animal fats.

Butter vs margarine: The nation's morning toast has been ruined for decades by kind-hearted women
Butter vs margarine: The nation’s morning toast has been ruined for decades by kind-hearted women

Taking a sample of middle-aged Australian men who had either experienced a heart attack or ­suffered from angina, half were advised to cut their animal fat intake and replace it with safflower oil (which is similar to sunflower oil) and safflower oil margarine, while the other half continued to eat as normal.

If the unholy alliance of Government nutritionists and the food processing industry were right — and margarine really was better for you, as they’ve been claiming for decades — you’d expect the men who switched to safflower oil to live longer and have better health outcomes.

The exact opposite turned out to be true. Those who ate more of the safflower-derived products were almost twice as likely to die from all causes, including heart disease.

Suddenly, margarine isn’t looking the healthy option that those expensive marketing campaigns claim it to be.

For a start, the once widely accepted wisdom that saturated fats are bad for you — an idea on which so much health advice is founded — is looking increasingly shaky.

So fast is the shift in scientific thinking that there is a growing belief that natural saturated fats — like those contained in dairy and meat, as opposed to those ­contained in marge — may actually turn out to be good for you.

Certainly, these fats have already been identified as key components of cell membranes, essential for the production of ­certain ­hormones and having an important role to play in the transport and absorption of certain vitamins and minerals.

Indeed, earlier this week, a meta-study (a study of studies, if you like) from America, covering almost 350,000 people, came to the sort of shock conclusion that a few years earlier would have made front-page news.

Losing faith: Our faith in the ­official health agencies melting away faster than .¿.¿. well, butter off a hot knife
Losing faith: Our faith in the ­official health agencies melting away faster than .¿.¿. well, butter off a hot knife

Now, however, it merely confirmed what a growing body of scientific opinion already believes — that there is, and never was, any good evidence linking intake of dietary saturated fats with blocked coronary arteries and heart disease.

It was, of course, in the belief that the exact opposite was true that millions of us were persuaded to give up butter and switch to margarine. Now, perhaps, you see why our public health advisers should be in the dock explaining themselves.

For so much of what we were told was gospel truth turns out to be plain wrong. Butter isn’t bad for you; in fact, it’s healthy, being high in vitamins, beneficial saturated fats, the sort of cholesterol that is vital for brain and nervous system development and various natural compounds with anti-fungal, anti-oxidant and even anti-cancer properties.

Margarine, by contrast, has always been much worse for you than its profit-grabbing manufacturers have ever been prepared to admit.

In the early days, it was made with ‘hydrogenated fats’, which were so dense that solid concrete couldn’t have done a better job of blocking your coronary arteries. Honestly, this stuff was lethal.

Confronted with irrefutable ­evidence, the food-processing giants reluctantly went back to their laboratories and reformulated their product.

This time, they boasted, ­margarine would be made with ‘interesterified’ vegetable oils (a treatment that re­arranges the fat molecules under high temperature and pressure, using enzymes or acids as catalysts).

It made the oils less dense and therefore, they hoped, less ­damaging to our health.

Buttering up: The good news is that we can carry on eating butter (in moderation, of course)
Buttering up: The good news is that we can carry on eating butter (in moderation, of course)

Why we should believe the manufacturers a second time around I haven’t a clue — especially as they never took responsibility for the tremendous damage they had done to global health with their hydrogenated fats — which are now banned in parts of the U.S. because of the concerns about the effects they have on our health.

The best part of 20 years on, the components of margarine, or ‘spreads’ as food processors prefer to call them, may have changed, but the arguments over their impact on health have not.

Take the so-called cholesterol-busting spreads such as Benecol and Flora ProActiv. Yes, they use plant chemicals — sterols and stanols — to reduce cholesterol ­levels, but they do so at a time when long-held beliefs on cholesterol are beginning to look as shaky as those about saturated fats.

There is emerging scientific evidence that overall health ­prospects may be better for ­individuals with above-average ­levels of cholesterol.

Once again, beliefs that have shaped official health diktats for decades are being turned on their head. More research urgently needs to be done, but that apology should precede it. ‘We got it wrong — sorry,’ would be a good start.

As for the so-called hybrid spreads, such as Lurpak Spreadable, for example — well, butter mixed with a little vegetable oil may be conveniently spreadable, but is fairly pointless in a country where, for most of the year, butter is spreadable when kept at room ­temperature in a good, old-­fashioned butter dish.

So the good news is that we can carry on eating butter (in moderation, of course) or even start eating it again if we were one of the millions duped into swapping it for unhealthy and unpalatable margarine.

But as we do, our faith in the ­official health agencies that shape our nation’s health policies is melting away faster than . . . well, butter off a hot knife.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2274747/At-truth-Butter-GOOD–margarine-chemical-gunk.html#ixzz2KJ7QgzCS
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