Why your poochie needs turmeric

turmeric rodney 
If you cook, you may already be familiar with turmeric, but for first timers, here’s a quick culinary lesson to get us started. The turmeric herb, a member of the ginger family, is most commonly known for its deep orange color and is used for cooking, herbal medicine and dyes. Native to Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian countries, it has been a staple in cooking for thousands of years. Today it is a key ingredient in most curry dishes as well as yummy Thai, Indian, and Persian plates.Ayurvedic and Chinese medicines have long known the benefits of turmeric for the body, inside and out.“Ay….ur…vedic medicine?”

Quick explanation. An ancient Ayurvedic proverb reads: “When diet is wrong medicine is of no use. When diet is correct medicine is of no need.” Ayurvedic medicine is the traditional medicine of India, originating over 5000 years ago. How is this relevant today? Because it doesn’t just look at the aspect of treatment, it looks at prevention and using elements like nutrition, exercise and lifestyle factors to re-establish balance in the body.

What we eat is a key component of this holistic healing approach.

Spice of Life

OK, back to turmeric. So we know that it’s a spice. It’s orange. We cook Eastern and Asian food with it. But why is it so good for our pets? The bio-active compound (active ingredient or healing properties) of turmeric is “curcumin” (not to be confused with a different spice called cumin). Curcumin is responsible for its bright orange color as well as a host of health benefits. This prime ingredient acts as a spice, but also as a pain reliever. For this reason, it’s a great food additive for pets that suffer from ailments and illnesses which cause pain.

But it’s also beneficial in many other ways! Let’s look a little closer at Eastern medicine to understand how it is used to maintain good health.

Traditional Asian medicine used turmeric for its ability to detoxify the body, purify the blood, stimulate bile production in the liver, disinfect wounds, and as a stomach tonic. In addition, Thais used it to treat diarrhea and other stomach ailments, as well as to eradicate ringworm, a fungal infection. In Afghanistan and Pakistan, turmeric is applied to wounds to cleanse and stimulate recovery, keeping harmful bacteria away.

Anti-EverythingWestern medicine is finally catching up with Eastern practice. Turmeric is now being researched extensively for pharmacological use in treating and/or reducing symptoms related to a wide range of health conditions. The National Institute of Health is conducting 19 clinical trials on turmeric and curcumin. A paper written for the American Academy of Pain Management discusses the health benefits of turmeric.

“Turmeric is one of the most potent natural anti-inflammatories available,”

says Dr. Randy J. Horwitz, the medical director of the Arizona Centre for Integrative Medicine and assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine.

Dr. Horwitz also cites a 2006 University of Arizona study that found this potent anti-inflammatory to reduce the symptoms associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical studies have shown that curcumin in turmeric is a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants neutralize free radicals which cause the painful inflammation and damage to joints affected by arthritis.

This is pretty significant for our senior K9 friends that may be suffering from the aches and pains associated with arthritis and aging in general.

The anti-inflammatory properties, combined with the fact that turmeric is a natural antiseptic and antibacterial agent, suggests that it’s also useful for disinfecting and treating skin injuries. Research suggests that when using it topically, mix it with honey. This creates a paste that you can easily apply to wounds. We talked about raw honey before, so you probably already know that honey also has high antibacterial properties. Of course, you will have to keep an eye on your furry friend as the combination of turmeric and honey may also be a tasty treat.

If you cook, you may already be familiar with turmeric, but for first timers, here’s a quick culinary lesson to get us started. The turmeric herb, a member of the ginger family, is most commonly known for its deep orange color and is used for cooking, herbal medicine and dyes. Native to Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian countries, it has been a staple in cooking for thousands of years. Today it is a key ingredient in most curry dishes as well as yummy Thai, Indian, and Persian plates.

Ayurvedic and Chinese medicines have long known the benefits of turmeric for the body, inside and out.

“Ay….ur…vedic medicine?”

Quick explanation. An ancient Ayurvedic proverb reads: “When diet is wrong medicine is of no use. When diet is correct medicine is of no need.” Ayurvedic medicine is the traditional medicine of India, originating over 5000 years ago. How is this relevant today? Because it doesn’t just look at the aspect of treatment, it looks at prevention and using elements like nutrition, exercise and lifestyle factors to re-establish balance in the body.

What we eat is a key component of this holistic healing approach.

Heart Health

Another concern with our senior pets is ensuring heart health. Like us, our pets are susceptible to blood clots and excess cholesterol. You may have heard of LDL (bad cholesterol) and HDL (good cholesterol). Well turmeric has been found to lower LDL levels which support both heart and liver health.

In addition, turmeric helps to thin the blood, reducing the risk of deadly clots that can lead to strokes and heart attacks. It’s important not to thin your dog’s blood too much, but the right amount can be helpful. If your pet is on medication, especially those that thin the blood, check with your vet for the appropriate dosage.

The Great Detoxifier

What about the liver? Yes, turmeric is good for that too.

Our environment is becoming more and more toxic and that not only affects us, it impacts Fido as well. Our pets are susceptible to toxins in the environment and in their food, especially commercially produced kibble and treats.

The liver plays a significant role in removing toxins from the body. Think of the liver as the main industrial centre for the body. It’s involved in nearly every biochemical process required to run the body. The body’s abilities to clot blood, to breakdown harmful toxins, and to remove waste and store energy, are all affected by the liver. It is a major player in your pet’s digestion, storing vitamins and producing bile which is necessary to break down fat. It’s a pretty important piece of machinery for your pet’s overall health.

Curcumin is believed to stimulate bile production necessary for the digestion of fat in the liver. Active dogs need at least 20% fat in their diet; therefore, bile production is critical for good health.

In short, turmeric boosts the liver’s ability to metabolize fat and remove waste from the body.

As with any pre-existing condition, if your pet already suffers from liver disease, you should consult your vet before treating with turmeric as some studies indicate that turmeric may aggravate existing problems.

Anti-Cancer Properties!!!!

One of the most interesting discoveries I made while investigating the benefits of turmeric is that there are now reports coming out claiming that turmeric may help in the fight against cancer! This powerful antioxidant plays a significant role in preventative medicine.

In a study at UCLA, doctors found that curcumin seemed to block the cancer promoting enzyme that stimulates the growth of head and neck cancer. The Department of Small Animal Clinical Scientists has conducted studies that show that curcumin can inhibit tumor growth and may even shrink existing tumors. This has to do with the spice’s amazing ability to shut down blood vessels that feed tumors.

Antioxidant properties are also helpful in reducing the negative side effects of chemotherapy.

Now, we are not saying turmeric is the only thing you should do to prevent, control and/or treat cancer; however, it certainly has us excited about its anti-cancer properties.

Other Uses

If we haven’t already convinced you about the health benefits of turmeric, here are a few more uses:

Aids in the treatment of epilepsy
Helps relieve allergies
Helps in preventing the formation of cataracts
Used in treating depression (Yes, dogs can get depressed too)
Kills parasites
Heals stomach ailments, aids in digestive disorders, and reduces gas and bloating
Acts as a binding agent and therefore great for treating diarrhea (Make sure you have lots of water available for your pet to drink!)
Aids in fat metabolism and weight management
High in fiber and rich in vitamins and mineral

So How Do I Feed It?

The suggested dosage is approximately 15 to 20 mg per pound of body weight in dogs, 150-200mg for cats. A simpler way of looking at it is an 1/8 to a 1/4 teaspoon per day, for every 10lbs of dog weight. Make sure your pet has lots of water to ensure that they don’t get constipated.

You can feed the powder, which is most commonly available, or crushed or fresh root. Sprinkle it right on top of your pet’s food and mix or, if you home cook, you can add it to the recipe. Quality varies and if you are buying turmeric in a local supermarket, it may be grown using nasty pesticides and herbicides. This lowers the potency. If possible, try to get high quality, organic turmeric. Be sure to store it in a tightly sealed container, kept in a cool, dark and dry place.

According to Dr. Demian Dressler, DVM known as the “Dog Cancer Vet” and author of Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog’s Life Quality and Longevity: “[…] curcumin has some bioavailability problems. This means that the stuff doesn’t, to a large extent, get absorbed into the blood after it is taken by mouth. However, there are ways around this.

Curcumin does not dissolve well in water. This is one of the things that limit its absorption. You can overcome this by mixing it with lecithin and water and making a slurry. Lecithin is available online. It is very, very gooey, so you must add some water to the curcumin-lecithin (about 4 parts water to 1 part lecithin). You can put some low sodium boullion, or similar agents, in it for flavor. Many of the commercial preparations have bromelain with it to enhance blood levels. No problem. Doses are approximate, and taken from human literature. For a large dog, use about 2 grams twice a day.”

Is There Anything Else I Should Know?

Remember how turmeric is a bright orange color? Well, the ancient monks used turmeric as a dye to stain their robes. Moral of the story: be careful and mix it in well with your pets’ food, because your pets might end up with turmeric mustaches!

Turmeric is a binding agent, so ensure that your pet has lots of water to reduce the likelihood of constipation.

Our research didn’t find many contradictions to taking turmeric medicinally. However, if your pet does have a pre-existing condition, is currently on medication, has a planned surgery, or is pregnant, it’s advisable to talk to your vet before feeding.

Spice up yours and your pet’s life with a little turmeric!

Link to making golden paste for your pet : http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/healing-with-turmeric-golden-paste-for-dogs/

Written by Planet Paws Blogger – Sarah MacKeigan
Sources & Information – Rodney Habib
Editor & Photographer – Lise Blinn

About Rodney Habib
Labeled the “Jamie Oliver of pet food” by his supporters, Pet Nutrition Blogger Rodney Habib is an award winning blogger, magazine writer, and is currently filming a TV series for Animal Planet focusing on pet obesity. He travels around the world, gathering current data from the Pet Industry, and relays it to his supporters. He has one goal in mind when it comes to all his work: to be the change he wants to see in the world. Visit Rodney and his retail pet store, Planet Paws at Facebook

Elderly dog given new lease on life with turmeric

Elderly dog given new lease on life with turmeric and caring new family

Image result for heart

Elizabeth Seal

A while back I posted about a 19 year old collie cross called Kia we offered a retirement home to after her owners left her at the pound to be pts. She was very stiff and could hardly walk, she has been on Golden Paste for just over 2 weeks now.. These are the results!



  • This is the recipe I use. smile emoticon thank you for your kind words everyone it means so much to me. I had originally thought we may only have her for a few months but now I’m starting to wonder if she will outlive us all ! 
    Elizabeth Seal's photo.


If people are interested they can follow her progress on Instagram. She’s currently doing a 100 day photo challenge entitled #100daysgoldenoldie




and a little more information :


* 150g of turmeric powder

* 250ml of water, and a little more in reserve if needed

* 1 ½ teaspoons of freshly ground black pepper

* 70ml cold pressed olive or coconut oil.

Place the water and turmeric in a pan, stirring over a gentle heat until you

have a thick paste. This should take about 7-10 minutes but don’t panic if it

takes longer! If your paste goes a little to thick add some of the extra water.

Once you have got your paste take off the heat and add the pepper and oil, stir

well make sure it is all mixed together. Allow to cool then store in a

sterilised glass jar in the fridge. The paste should keep for up to 4 weeks.

This paste is for animals and humans, start off on about 1\4tsp and

gradually build up over a few weeks, until you see a difference in

yourself/animal. Feed morning and evening if possible. There isn’t a specific dosage

so what works for one may not work for the other.

Piperine, from fresh ground black pepper, will increase the absorbency of

other substances in your stomach- so if you are on regular medication, you may

experience a higher absorbency rate than intended for those drugs. Please

consult your doctor or pharmacist.


Source: Turmeric User Group UK (Facebook)

Coconut Oil for your Pets



35 Awesome Uses for Coconut Oil:

1. Winter moisturizer for paws, nose and ears
2. Can protect the liver from toxic antibiotic drugs
3. Reduces Hairballs
4. Reduces Cancer risks
5. Rub into the skin as a basic lotion
6. To support healthy thyroid function
7. To help increase sun tolerance and avoid burning
8. Topically to kill yeast or yeast infections in pets
9. It’s high Lauric acid and MCFA content helps boost metabolism
10. Gives your pet a shiny, glossy coat
11. Topically, can help skin heal faster after injury or infection
12. Can help sooth psoriasis or eczema
13. There is some evidence that regular ingestion of coconut oil can help prevent or reverse Alzheimers
14. Can be used as a natural suncreen
15. Is energy boosting
16. There is some evidence that coconut oil helps digestion and may even kill intestinal parasites or yeast
17. Mix a tablespoon with a tablespoon of chia seeds for an all-day energy boost (do NOT take this at night!)
18. Can help improve insulin levels
19. Coconut oil and a drop of oregano oil helps improve gum health
20. Awesome for high-temperature cooking than olive or vegetable oils (doesn’t go carcinogenic!)
21. Is an immediate source of energy when eaten and isn’t stored as fat
22. As a naturally antibacterial skin cream
23. It’s anti-inflammatory properties can help lessen arthritis
24. Can stimulate hair growth
25. Can help speed weight loss when consumed daily
26. Can be used to speed healing of fungal infections when taken internally and used externally
27. It has been shown to increase absorption of calcium and magnesium
28. Some evidence shows that the beneficial fats in coconut oil can help with depression and anxiety
29. For pets struggling with skin issues when used externally
30. Some evidence suggests that the beneficial fats in coconut oil are helpful for those with Autism
31. A tablespoon taken before each meal can help improve digestion
32. Many use it as an anti-aging facial moisturizer
33. Can be used internally and externally to speed recovery from UTIs
34. When taken regularly, it can help fight candida
35. Ingesting coconut oil daily can help with allergy symptoms

Want more information? Read our blog here → http://ow.ly/rkncX


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Ranked in the top 10 most important food medicines, coconut oil is a must add to your pet’s diet! With over 13 Evidence-Based Medicinal Properties, the one we love the most is its yeast-bustin’ abilities!

Almost 50% of the medium-chain triglycerides found in coconut oil are lauric acids, saturated fatty acids that our bodies convert into monolaurin. Monolaurin is one of the natural world’s greatest antivirals, antibacterials and antifungals. Because they come from natural sources, these fatty acids pose no danger to your pets’ bodies, unlike man-made antibiotics and anti-virals.

Coconut has been used for wound healing for thousands of years. A new study published in the International Journal of Dermatology confirms that coconut oil aides in treating atopic dermatitis, a chronic skin condition characterized by scaly and itchy rashes.

Furthermore, one study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food found that “coconut oil is extremely effective at killing Candida albicans, a common yeast infection in humans.” Another study published in the Journal of Bacteriology discovered that “coconut oil can help kill Staphylococcus aureus, which is a common cause of skin conditions and respiratory diseases.”

The recommended dosage for feeding is:

• ½ teaspoon for every 10 lbs of body weight daily

Or, if using topically, just rub the oil on your hands and apply to your pet’s coat (remember not to over do it!).

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A great coconut oil available in South Africa, from, this link:



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Health Tip of the Week – Organic Coconut Oil!

We know that by now you have probably heard all about the benefits of coconut oil, so why yet another coconut oil article!? When our star editor and writer, Lise Blinn, wrote this article last summer and dropped it onto our desks, we thought it was great. However, we’d wait until the winter before publishing it.

Wrong decision! Deemed one of the top 5 additions to your pet’s diet by Dogs Naturally Mag, the news hit fast & cue the hundreds of blogs on coconut oil that came out in the following months!

In the great words of Ricky Bobby: “If ya ain’t first, yer last!”

Why did we wait? The main focus in all of the coconut oil articles was on allergies, and so it rightfully should be. As Lise had written in her original article, “Allergies develop when immune system gets out of balance. An allergic response or reaction happens when the immune system overreacts to an allergen. A common misconception is that you have to strengthen the immune system to fight allergies; however, it is not a question of strength, but of balance.

There are as many ways to deal with pet allergies as there are actual allergies. One of the most interesting that I have read about this summer season is a product that I myself particularly love using while cooking: coconut oil!

The health benefits of coconut oil in humans include hair care, skin care, stress relief, maintaining cholesterol levels, weight loss, increased immunity, proper digestion and metabolism, relief from kidney problems, heart diseases, high blood pressure, dental care, and bone strength.”

But how can this be helpful for pets? Below is a list of health benefits for our furry friends in accordance with Dr. Bruce Fife:

• Improves digestion and nutrient absorption
• Aids healing of digestive disorders like inflammatory bowel syndrome and colitis
• Reduces or eliminates bad breath in dogs
• Aids in elimination of hairballs and coughing
• Contains powerful antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-fungal agents that prevent infection and diseases
• Regulates and balances insulin and promotes normal thyroid function
• Helps prevent or control diabetes
• Helps reduce weight, increases energy
• Aids in arthritis or ligament problems

So although it is clearly great for allergies, we would like to go one step further and talk about yet another great benefit from this incredible fat: its therapeutic properties on your pet’s skin. Besides all the incredible info on the positive health benefits of ingesting coconut oil for you and your pets, it has also been used for decades by professional massage therapists to help protect skin from the aging effects of free radicals and to help improve the appearance of skin with its anti-aging benefits. Our logic was that we should wait a few months until the winter; a time for dry skin, thin coats, cracked noses and paws, and flaky skin! Continuing with Dr. Bruce Fife’s findings, coconut oil:

• Clears up skin conditions such as eczema, flea allergies, contact dermatitis, and itchy skin
• Reduces allergic reactions and improves skin health
• Makes coats become sleek and glossy, and deodorizes doggy odor
• Prevents and treats yeast and fungal infections, including candida
• Disinfects cuts and promotes wound healing

Physiologist and biochemist Dr. Ray Peat explains, “When coconut oil is absorbed into your skin and connective tissues, it helps to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles by helping to keep your connective tissues strong and supple, and aids in exfoliating the outer layer of dead skin cells, making your skin smoother.”

So you can see the double dose of beneficial effects that this oil could have on your pet. Instead of driving around town in search of a cream or potion that will help with your pet’s damaged skin, you can use a virgin organic coconut oil instead! (Virgin and extra-virgin coconut oils are made from the first pressing of fresh, raw coconut without the addition of any chemicals).

We believe the main focus should not be on the coconut itself, conversely on the Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs). The main component of the MCTs is Lauric Acid (Lore–ick), a powerful virus and gram-negative bacteria destroyer. This is what makes up over 50% of the good stuff. Basically, it is what makes this oil so special! Dr. Joseph Mercola calls Lauric Acid a “miracle ingredient because of its unique health promoting properties.”

Lauric Acid is also super rare stuff! Try finding it in large bioavailable doses elsewhere. Unless you have a supply of breast milk kicking around, you are out of luck!

The second best thing about this saturated fat is that it is super easily digested by your pets without hampering their systems. Pets with GI issues or sensitive stomachs can benefit from coconut oil because it does not need lipase, an enzyme that the body uses to break down fats in food so that they can be absorbed in the intestines. Nor does it need bile from the gallbladder to help process it, as with many other essential fatty acids! It is easy to assimilate and digest!

Some of you may have heard about damaged molecules in heated oils becoming toxic! The process of hydrogenation manipulates vegetable and seed oils by adding hydrogen atoms while heating the oil. This produces a rancid, thickened oil that really only benefits processed food shelf life and corporate profits. This is so prevalent in oils that the medical and scientific communities are now fairly united in the opinion that hydrogenated vegetable and seed oils should be avoided. No need to worry about that with coconut oil, whose structure is not affected when heated.

If you’re thinking about adding coconut oil to your shopping list, it is suggested to buy 100% organic virgin coconut oil. Often, you can find various coconut oils in organic health food stores or in the organic section of your local grocery store. But remember that it’s important to start slow. Introduce coconut oil a little at a time in very small doses. If your pets show any negative reaction to the coconut oil, discontinue use immediately.

The reason for this phased-in approach is because coconut oil kills bacteria, viruses, parasites, yeasts, and fungi. Your dog may respond negatively to this detoxification. Signs of detoxing too rapidly may include lethargy, fatigue, and diarrhea. If your dog does have any such reaction, just temporarily cut the daily amount back to allow your dog’s system to gently adjust. This is another reason why dividing your dog’s intake of coconut oil between two feedings a day is a good approach.

It is best to give coconut oil with food. You can drizzle the coconut oil on top of your dog’s kibble or other food. The recommended maximum dosage is:

• ¼ teaspoon for every 10lbs of body weight twice daily, or
• ½ teaspoon for every 10lbs of body weight once daily.

1 tablespoon of coconut oil can be around 130 calories, so make sure you remove an equal portion of calories out your pet’s diet & daily required calorie intake when adding in.

Give it a try! And don’t forget to add the delicious ingredient to your own diet as well!

Columnist & Editor – Lise Blinn

Co-written – Rodney Habib, Pet Nutrition Blogger

Flea and tick powder DIY

How To Make An Effective Flea And Tick Powder For Your Pets

How  To Make An Effective Flea And Tick Powder For Your Pets

Nobody likes to see their pets bothered by fleas and ticks. Here is a recipe using four ingredients that can be used on your four legged friends as well as in the garden for repelling and killing fleas, ticks, mosquitos, ants, spiders and other bugs and is recommended by holistic vets.

Contrary to popular belief fleas cannot fly, but are passed from pet to pet contact, or from furnishings or even plants onto pets. Their bites start a nasty cycle of itching and scratching. In severe cases it can result in hair loss, skin inflammation or infection to your beloved furry friends. Some chemical solutions will cause allergic reactions and also resistance can be built up over time hence rendering them less effective.

This homemade remedy uses four ingredients that are recognized as insect repellents. Here is a brief description of each:

Eucalyptus (eucalyptus globulus, eucalyptus citriodoro) is a known natural bug and insect repellent. Eucalytpus oil is an effective way to get rid of fleas in your home. It comes from the seeds of the eucalyptus tree and produces a strong scent that fleas and other insects find unbearable. Studies have shown that it can be more effective than DEET. An additional benefit of this essential oil is that it is an antiseptic so can sooth the skin following insect bites.

(Please note this ingredient should be omitted if applying to cats as they are sensitive to many essential oils. Eucalyptus oil should not be ingested by pets. Do not allow your pet to chew on toys, collars or bedding that is treated directly with the oil).

Yarrow is a healing herb which can be used to treat wounds due to it’s anti-inflammatory properties and used to be a vital herb used in wartime. It has also been shown to have pain relieving properties and is anti-microbial. Pets that suffer from a flea infestation will often go on to get infected bites. Powdered yarrow can help heal and sooth the irritated skin helping to stop the itching/scratching vicious circle.

Neem is another herb which has been used for centuries due to it’s antiseptic, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral, and blood-purifying properties. It can be used on pets in oil or powder form as a herbal insect repellent, repelling fleas, ticks, lice, mites, ants and mosquitoes (i) . It actually inhibits the metamorphosis of the larvae thus preventing the rapid breeding of these bugs. It is also moisturising so it helps heal any dry skin or scaling which would otherwise occur from the skin irritation.

This is also known as Diatomaceous Earth (DE) and is a naturally occurring, soft, siliceous sedimentary rock consisting of fossilized remains of diatoms, a type of hard-shelled algae, that is easily crumbled into a fine white to off-white powder. DE particles are so small so it just feels like a fine baby powder to humans and pets. It is a simply a mineral silica.
Food grade fresh water DE is harmless to humans and pets because it is not a poison – the bugs do not ingest it. DE is chrystaline in structure. It works by scratching the bodies of the insects and causing them to dehydrate. Because Diatomaceous Earth can by very drying, Neem counteracts the dryness and helps protect your pet from excess dry skin.
This food grade DE can be purchased at some plant nurseries BUT be sure and specify that you want food grade (not crystallized or filter grade). DE products are registered for use against bed bugs, cockroaches, crickets, fleas, ticks, spiders, and many other pests.

20 drops of Eucalyptus Essential Oil (remember to omit this for cats)
Half a cup of Yarrow Powder
Half a cup of Neem Powder
1 cup of Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth

Simply mix all of the above together in a jar with a shaker lid. Sprinkle on to your pet along the spine whilst brushing the fur in the opposite direction to ensure the powder makes contact with the skin. Also rub it onto their belly, legs and tail always ensuring that it gets to the skin. It can help to rub in with a powder puff or cotton wool pad. Take care to avoid any contact with their eyes and nose.

When this is being applied as a preventative measure once a month should keep your pet bug free throughout the spring and summer months when fleas are most prevalent. However following a bath or they go out in the wet then you should reapply.
If it is being applied to treat an active infestation then apply every other day until you can no longer see any trace of the fleas. Then just apply as above for maintenance.
It is important to also treat your home to prevent re-infestation. You can apply this same powder to pet bedding, soft furnishings, windowsills and floors. Just apply a light dusting to these areas and leave it overnight. Vacuum the following day. Repeat once a week for a month.

For other natural ways to effectively get rid of fleas from your home, garden and pets please see :

(i) http://www.discoverneem.com/neem-oil-for-dogs.html

If you know a pet owner who would love to banish fleas and ticks without resorting to harsh chemicals then please feel free to share this information by clicking one of the share buttons below.

Flea bag in your home?

6 Ways to Naturally Prevent and Get Rid of Fleas on Dogs

I share my life with many four-legged friends, owning 2 dogs and fostering at least 2 others at any given time. My canine companions make up a huge part of my life so, naturally, I want to care for them…naturally. Like human medications popular dog medications, such as flea and tick preventatives, are full of strange chemicals that could have potentially harmful side effects. If you have little ones running around the house, you don’t want them getting into the medication or touching the dog after it’s applied. Since I foster and have rescues coming in from all kinds of places, I have to be up on the flea care year round. Instead of constantly applying synthetic repellents, there are natural substitutes I can turn to that can help keep the little beasties at bay.

6 Home Remedies for Fleas- keep your dogs bite free without using harsh chemicals.

Why the ingredients: The essential oils/ingredients used here are all natural insecticide/pesticides, shown to either kill or deter the pests due to their various compounds/naturally occurring chemicals. Indeed, many of them are found in commercial flea/tick preventative.

1. Flea collar

A flea collar is a great way to ward off fleas without always having to reapply something topically, and it keeps the flea control constant and steady.

You will need…

-3-5 drops of cedar oil or lavender oil
– 1-3 tablespoons of water
-Bandana OR your dog’s collar
-an eyedropper (optional)


Dilute 2-3 drops of your chosen oil in 1-3 tablespoons of water. Some people use the oil undiluted, but I personally feel it should always be diluted, even if it’s only by a little. Next, pick out a bandana to be the flea collar-I think a bandana is preferable because you can take it on and off and your dog’s collar won’t smell. It’s always fun to get creative with patterns and colors here. If you go up to ½ teaspoon you can use up to 5 drops of the liquid. Using an eyedropper or other similar means, apply 5-10 drops of the mixture to the bandana and rub the sides of the fabric together, and then tie it about your dog’s neck in a snazzy way. Reapply oil mixture to the collar once a week. In conjunction with this, 1 or 2 drops of oil diluted with at least 1 tablespoon of olive oil can be placed at the base of your dog’s tail.

flea collar


2. Flea deterring drink- can be used alongside any of these remedies.

You will need…

-1 teaspoon white distilled vinegar or apple cider vinegar


For every 40 pound dog add 1 teaspoon of white distilled vinegar or apple cider vinegar to 1 quart of their drinking water. We highly recommend using Braggs Apple Cider Vinegar. Not only does it deter fleas, it improves a pups skin and coat condition from the inside-out.

drink to get rid of fleas

3. Flea comb

This contains lemon and lemon contains something called limonene, which is a chemical that kills and repels fleas but is harmless to us or our pets.

You will need…

-1 freshly sliced up lemon
-1 pot of fresh water
-a comb, sponge, or brush


Boil a pot of water and add the slices of a freshly cut lemon to it. Turn off the heat after the lemons has been added and cover the pot, letting the mixture steep overnight. The next day dip a comb or your pets brush in the liquid (make sure it’s sufficiently cool) and run it through their hair. A sponge works as well, especially if you have a very short haired breed. A quick version is to bring water to a vigorous boil and then pour over a freshly sliced lemon. Then just dip the comb, let it cool, and use as above.


4. Flea spray

As a bonus, your pup will get a nice gleaming finish to their coat after using this flea spray.

You will need…

-1 cup white distilled vinegar OR 1 cup apple cider vinegar OR a 50/50 blend of both
-1 quart fresh water
-2-3 drops of lavender or cedar oil
-a decent sized spray bottle


The essential oil isn’t vital, but it certainly gives the spray an extra edge (and a nice smell.) If you’re using it, add 2-3 drops as you add 1 cup of white distilled vinegar/apple cider vinegar/both to 1 quart of fresh water. Fill your spray bottle, and mist your dog, being careful not to get it in their eyes, nose, or ears-aka avoid spraying near the face. To get up around the neck and behind the ears/their chin area, dampen a soft cloth with the mixture and wipe it on. Spray your pets bedding and around it with this mixture lightly as well.

flea spray

5. Flea (be-gone) bag

This little sachet contains things that smell pleasant to us, but that drive pests away from your pet.

You will need…

-Two 6 inch squares of breathable fabric (such as muslin)
-a rough handful of cedar chips
-1-2 teaspoons of dried lavender buds
-the peel of 1 lemon


Follow the instructions on how to make a sachet here if you need more detail. Cut 2 6 inch squares of fabric and place them together inside out. Sew all but 1 side and turn inside out. Fill with a rough handful of fragrant cedar chips, 1-2 teaspoons of lavender, and 1 lemon peel. Leave enough room at the top so you can tie it off with a ribbon or sew it shut (tying allows you to reuse it when the contents lose their potency.) Place under your pets bed/bedding or near it to ward off fleas. Change the mixture every month or so.

flea bag

6. Flea bath- wash your pup with this weekly to deter fleas.

You will need…

-A half a cup of freshly squeezed lemon juice*
-1 ½ – 2 cups of fresh water
-1/4 –1/2 cup of mild pet-friendly soap or shampoo


Stir together a half a cup of lemon juice, 1 ½ cups of water, and ¼ cup of mild pet-friendly shampoo or soap. Bottle and label and bathe weekly to keep fleas away.

*amounts will vary depending on the size of your dog. As a general rule of thumb, use 2 parts water to every ½ cup of soap and lemon juice.

NOTE: You must always dilute essential oil before using them. Pay attention to and read andrespect your dog’s body language. It may sound odd, but let them sniff the different scents and see how they react. Whichever one you think they “like” the most, or will tolerate should be the one you use. It is estimated that dogs can identify scents 1,000-10,000 times better than humans. Imagine something you hate the smell of, and then imagine it being rubbed all over your body and smelling it 1,000 times stronger!

I cannot begin to say how engrained into my life dogs are. Their wellbeing is of the utmost importance to me, and if I can avoid strange chemicals, I will do so in the same way I avoid them myself. Dogs are natural beings, just as we are, and should rightly be treated as such.


Cat owner? Take a look at our flea remedies for cats.


Source: http://everydayroots.com/flea-remedies-for-cats


Pets and animals – help from CDS and DMSO

Jim Humble’s CDS

(Chlorine Dioxide Solution)

and DMSO saves the day with distemper

These products are now available from BIO-SIL at : www.biosil.co.za 

CDS for pets

Here’s some lovely first-hand advice from a rescue centre:
I have used DMSO topically on humans ,horses, most of my animals and now been adding the DMSO into the CDS for the distemper.Apart from their smelly breath, they all alot better.I have been adding CDS to all their water indoors so that the chickens,ducks,dogs,birds,geese and cats get it and to the horses food in the morning and evening.I have “played”with the doses for the dogs to see how far I can push the CDS before they get queasy.

This is all amazing and I am so glad I found the CDS as using the MMS was rather difficult in dosing so many dogs ,with the CDS it is not as bad. I have completed a course of 4 weeks of with 8 hours a day of CDS for 17 dogs. I am carrying on but have reduced it to 6 hours every hour.

The Distemper specifics :
I started using CDS when we realised that we were dealing with a more vicious virus than just common everyday virus in a dog.   I started with the protocol 1000 to get their bodies used to the CDS building up to the protocol 2000 and then to the 3000 – using -+ 15 -18 drops per dog in the beggining,and  I was using DMSO with every CDS dose. At that stage I was prepared to over dose the dogs and treat dehydration than treat distemper and watch my dogs have seizures and literally fade away under my nose.(we lost 3 dogs as we started with the MMS / CDS treatment with the neurological side effects of distemper)
I maintained a course of dosing for 9 hours every day for 4 weeks , the same protocol one would use for HIV (dosing dogs of different sizes became a challenge as we have dogs from dachshund sizes to Weimeraner and Labrador size) and dosing 17 dogs daily, for 9 hours a day for 4 solid weeks was exhausting . I had to watch for nausea , vomiting and runny tummies daily.  Once the 4 weeks came to a final close and I was satisfied that the dogs could only go forward and not backwards, I reduced the dosing to 6 hourly with DMSO, watching them like a hawk for ANY side effects of twitching,snotty nose etc.
We are currently on day 4 on the first week on the 6 hourly doses. We have completed a whole 4 weeks of dosing with no relapses and not another heart breaking death …… so we can only be on the right road now!!!  I will maintain a steady dosing pattern for another few weeks to just MAKE SURE we are all healed and that we cannot encounter any form of relapse.
I will reduce it every week until we are on a maintenance level (as long as there are no relapses).  I gave up my job to be with my dogs through this devastating time.
I have now put CDS into my horses’ food, dogs’ water, cats’, ducks’, geese, pig, birds’ and chickens’ water on a daily basis and i will never be without CDS again!!!!!

Thank you to Yvonne,Shannon and Gordon for helping me out with questions and answers and  numerous frantic deliveries when I couldnt …and still can’t leave the farm due to the hourly dosing!! If it weren’t for you three and countless prayers……. I wouldn’t have a single dog left by my side!

All my love



Pets – preventing and treating diseases naturally

Colloidal Silver Uses:

Preventing and Treating Diseases in Cats and Dogs

Author:  Claudio Matsuoka from Curitiba, Brazil  Photo from Wikimedia Commons
Author: Claudio Matsuoka from Curitiba, Brazil Photo from Wikimedia Commons

Source: Caspain blue

Colloidal silver works to destroy bacterial, fungal and viral infections in cats and dogs just as well as it does in human beings. Furthermore, because colloidal silver is odorless, almost tasteless and non-toxic, experts say you can use it for both dogs and cats internally and externally.

If you are looking for a healthy, alternative way to take care of your pets and avoid expensive veterinary bills, colloidal silver can go a long way in helping you achieve that goal. Whether you are looking for a disease preventative, a way to clean your pet and his bedding or deal with illness and injuries, it can help you.

It is a very inexpensive, easy to make and use alternative to pharmaceutical antibiotics, and it is much more effective at stopping preventing and treating diseases in animals.ore effective at stopping preventing and treating diseases in animals.

Laborador Pup - Photo from Wikimedia Commons.
Laborador Pup – Photo from Wikimedia Commons.

Source: John Schauentaub

Colloidal Silver Knocks Out Deadly Canine Parvo Virus

For example, one of the deadliest and most feared viruses among dog and kennel owners is canine parvo.  But, colloidal silver is a well-known alternative treatment for dogs suffering from parvo, and according to pet owners it has saved a lot of lives.  On the other hand, conventional veterinary treatments fail because they only have antibiotics, which do nothing to stop viral infections.  Yet, they prescribe them in cases of canine parvo and about 80% of the time, the dog dies.

Grey Twins
Grey Twins

Source: Own Work

It is Safe for Cats

Colloidal silver is also good for treating cats because it does not have a strong odor and will not be harmful to them if you put it on their fur.  In cases where a cat suffers from a bacterial, viral or fungal skin condition, colloidal silver can be used.

While many essential oils are effective in combating such conditions and are often safe to use on dogs, they should never be used on cats.  But, experts say you can use colloidal silver without fear.

Cat and Dog at Fisherman's Wharf -  BrokenSphere / Wikimedia Commons.
Cat and Dog at Fisherman’s Wharf – BrokenSphere / Wikimedia Commons.

Source: BrokenSphere

Topical and Oral Treatments

Colloidal silver is an excellent alternative to both pharmaceutical antibiotics and prescription or over-the-counter anti-fungal treatments for cats and dogs.  It can be given to your pet in his food or water or applied to his skin or fur a few times a day.

A few drops of colloidal silver on a cotton ball makes an excellent eyewash for pets with eye infections.  Persian cats are especially prone to such infections and must have their eyes washed daily.  Using colloidal silver provides extra antibiotic protection.

One or two drops of colloidal silver in the ears of a cat or dog with an ear infection is a safe, fast and effective way to safely treat them.  There’s no need for a trip to the veterinarian or expensive pharmaceuticals.  A few drops of colloidal silver can do the job in a day or two.

More Ways to Keep Pets Healthy with Colloidal Silver

Many people like to brush their dogs’ teeth. Colloidal silver can be applied directly into a pet’s mouth to help reduce bacteria, heal oral tissues and keep the gums and teeth clean. For dogs, it can also be added to homemade tooth powders and rinses.

Whether your pets live indoors or outdoors, they will be healthier and cleaner and so will you when you use colloidal silver.

Keep your pet’s bedding clean and free of bacteria and parasites when you regularly spray it with undiluted colloidal silver and allow it to air dry.

One or two tablespoons of colloidal silver in your pet’s food or water dish will keep his immune system strong and help prevent disease.

Preserve opened cans and containers of pet food in the refrigerator and make it last a few days longer by adding a few drops of colloidal silver to it.

If your pet is injured, spray or dab colloidal silver on the wound. If possible, bandage it until it heals.

Your dogs and cats are part of your family. Care for them like family members with colloidal silver and protect them from unnecessary visits to the veterinarian. Your cats and dogs will be healthier and live longer.

How to Learn More About Colloidal Silver Uses

It is important to use colloidal silver responsibly. There is a lot of controversy about safe doses because there are no official established guidelines as there are for most other nutritional supplements. Fortunately, an excellent, free 16-page report helps to answer this question, “What’s the ‘Safest’ Daily Dosage for Colloidal Silver.” It is available exclusively from The Silver Edge.

The author of this report, natural health journalist Steve Barwick, has done extensive research on colloidal silver. He, also, wrote the 547-page, “Ultimate Colloidal Silver Manual,” a veritable compendium of information on this subject, which also gives you appropriate dosages and uses for colloidal silver.

Learn more about colloidal silver as a natural antimicrobial in the article, “Colloidal Silver Uses: Colloidal Silver as a Natural Antibiotic.”